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November 21, 2019 at 1:30 PM - Academic Affairs Committee

Agenda
Call to Order
Roll Call/Declaration of Quorum
Information Items
A. Master of Science in Criminal Justice - Letter of Notification to THEC to Establish Master's Program
Background Information:  Austin Peay State University intends to submit a Letter of Notification to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) to develop a Master of Science in Criminal Justice with a concentration in Homeland Security. The proposed program focuses on analytical and critical-thinking skills, opens opportunities for career advancement and prepares graduates for further academic endeavors. Further, the proposed program provides opportunities to access graduate education to active-duty military personnel, retired military personnel, law enforcement workers, former APSU undergraduates and others with baccalaureate degrees.
 
Description:  Proposed Implementation Date: Fall 2021

Item Details:
APSU’s Department of Criminal Justice proposes a Master of Science in Criminal Justice with a concentration in Homeland Security. The proposed academic program includes a Homeland Security concentration, but students may complete the degree without the concentration. The proposed M.S. in Criminal Justice supports APSU’s vision and mission, by fostering quality learning environments that, "create a collaborative, integrative learning community, instilling in students’ habits of critical inquiry as they gain knowledge, skills, and values for life and work in a global society" and "raising the educational attainment of the citizenry, developing programs and services that address regional needs."

The program will support quality graduate education in the field of criminal justice and homeland security through coursework promoting a core understanding of relevant research methodologies, criminological theory, criminal justice processes, domestic and international terrorism, and social policy. The proposed graduate program anticipates initially admitting 20-30 students and potentially increasing in number to 40-50 students by year three. In a recent survey of 116 graduating seniors majoring or minoring in Criminal Justice, 80% reported an interest in a master’s program in Criminal Justice. With an average of 112 Criminal Justice graduates per year, the demand for a graduate program is evident and strongly supported by the current undergraduate population. 

Enrolled students can take advantage of research opportunities designed to enhance their graduate education, as well as opportunities to hone professional skills that are valuable in the workplace. Students completing an M.S. in Criminal Justice will be well versed in the areas of homeland security, law enforcement, courts, corrections, ethics, research methodology, current social issues, theoretical underpinnings, and complex challenges facing the criminal justice system and national defense. The proposed program emphasizes the application of theoretical perspectives to domestic and international terrorism, domestic crime, and relevant criminal justice issues. Further, study design and research methodologies underscore the analysis of real world problems throughout the curriculum and highlight the scientific nature of the discipline. Graduates will be competitively positioned for careers in national security and the criminal justice system, as well as prime candidates for advancement in their military careers.

The Department of Criminal Justice (CRJ) currently houses an undergraduate program with approximately 400 majors. Additionally, undergraduate CRJ majors have the option of declaring a Homeland Security concentration, an independent Homeland Security minor, and/or a minor in Global Security Studies (GSS). The M.S.. in Criminal Justice program will provide an opportunity for education beyond the undergraduate program, while bolstering the rigor of the undergraduate program through competition for admission to the graduate program. Finally, it is anticipated that instituting a graduate program will further enhance the undergraduate curriculum and create additional exposure to research for undergraduates.

The proposed curriculum is aligned with national norms while still maintaining some uniqueness. The uniqueness of the proposed curriculum differentiates the M.S. in Criminal Justice from programs offered at other state institutions by specializing in Homeland Security and leveraging professional experiences of APSU faculty and military officials from Fort Campbell. The M.S. in Criminal Justice provides an avenue to expand and enhance the existing homeland security and criminal justice "workforce" in the state and region. 

Potential applicants will be drawn from the following populations:
  • Current undergraduate students or recent graduates who wish to continue their education. These individuals seek to obtain an M.S. in  Criminal Justice to improve their skills and to enhance their marketability. The M.S. in Criminal Justice will also prepare students pursuing doctoral level education in Criminal Justice.
  • Current employees of homeland security and criminal justice agencies who wish to advance their career. A graduate degree is becoming commonplace for those desiring advancement in their current careers or as avenues for new career opportunities. Homeland security, law enforcement, probation, parole, and various advocacy groups seek talented individuals with advanced education, which the M.S. in Criminal Justice degree would provide.
  • Military personnel who desire education beyond the bachelor’s degree. Austin Peay State University is unique in its proximity to and relationship with the Fort Campbell military base. Fort Campbell, Kentucky has the third largest military population within the army and ranks the seventh largest within the department of defense with approximately 29,000 active duty military and 112,629 retirees. The proximity and relationship to Ft. Campbell positions the M.S. in Criminal Justice to provide a relevant program to military personnel and assist with promotions. The United States Army provides professional development in the form of tuition assistance and supports graduate education for those seeking promotion beyond the rank of Captain. Therefore, active duty military and retirees are exceptional candidates for the proposed program and an underserved pool of potential students already exists in close proximity to the campus.
The Hanover Research feasibility study reveals a substantial increase (36.6%) in student demand for the proposed M.S. in Criminal Justice program. Hanover Research’s report states, "The influx of student demand indicates that APSU is well positioned to serve this market demand and offer a new criminal justice program." The report recognizes that nationally, criminal justice programs are relatively flat (0.4 percent growth), however Tennessee and the southeast appear to growing rapidly at 5.4 percent growth. The biggest contributor to growth is found in the law enforcement careers that commonly appeal to military personnel seeking to transition into the civilian workforce.

Furthermore, the Hanover Research study revealed a national decline (5.2%) percent in criminal justice-based occupations. However, in stark contrast, Tennessee is experiencing growth (9.7%) and the southeast as a whole is experiencing a 6.1% increase in criminal justice-based occupations. Collectively, Tennessee and the southeast anticipate continued growth in the criminal justice labor market between 12%-13% over the next five years.

The feasibility of the proposed graduate program is a strong indicator of demand. Based on student interest surveys, the proposed program appears to address an unmet need of undergraduate majors. APSU’s undergraduate criminal justice students alone could support the proposed program and Hanover Research’s analysis reveals additional indicators of demand given the significantly greater labor market needs projected for the Clarksville region and the Southeastern United States. The proposed graduate program supports APSU’s mission to serve its community, including a significant military affiliated student population, the region, and the state of Tennessee.

In addition to seeking APSU Board of Trustees and THEC approval in the coming months, the addition of the new graduate program in criminal justice represents a substantive change with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). Thus at the appropriate time the university will submit a prospectus to SACSCOC.
 
B. Bachelor of Science in National Security Studies - Letter of Notification to THEC to Establish Bachelor's Program
Background Information:  Austin Peay State University intends to submit a Letter of Notification to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) to develop a Bachelor of Science in National Security Studies (NSS). The purpose of the proposed program is to provide a quality education of relevant social science research methodologies, an increasingly interconnected global community, threats to international order and basic human rights. Students completing the proposed B.S. in NSS will be well versed in the areas of homeland security, international security, terrorism, violent extremism and the complex challenges facing the entire global community. The proposed program will emphasize the application of theoretical perspectives to the multi-faceted security environment, as well as research methodologies for the analysis of real-world problems. Graduates of the program would be competitively positioned for careers in all sectors of national defense, homeland security and criminal justice as well as prime candidates for advancement in their military careers.
 
Description:  Proposed Implementation Date: Fall 2021

Item Details:
The proposed Bachelor of Science in National Security Studies (BS NSS) will be housed in the Department of Criminal Justice and initially share faculty and courses from History, Political Science and Public Administration, Sociology, Psychology, and Criminal Justice. Given the strengths of the department and courses already developed, the Department of Criminal Justice proposes a 39-hour major that draws upon the academic strengths of faculty and established resources. Five (5) courses (15 hours) would form a common core required of all students. Two (2) courses would be chosen from a group of classes in "Homeland Security".  Two (2) courses would be chosen from a group of classes in "International Security", with an additional 15 hours of elective courses designed to support the student’s educational goals and career aspirations. No new courses will need to be designed for the proposed BS NSS program. However, as new faculty experts join APSU, it is anticipated new courses will become part of the future direction of the major to best prepare graduates for an ever changing and challenging career in national security occupations.

Summary of BS NSS curriculum (120 credit hours)
  • 39 credit hours of major credits
  • 42 credit hours of general education core
  • 39 credit hours of elective credits

The Department of Criminal Justice (CRJ) currently houses an undergraduate program with approximately 400 majors. Additionally, the current undergraduate CRJ majors have the option of declaring a Homeland Security concentration, an independent Homeland Security minor, and/or a minor in Global Security Studies (GSS). APSU anticipates that the proposed BS NSS will pull some students from existing APSU degrees. However, the proposed BS NSS will have a unique and strong marketable future for degree holders that APSU believes will also attract new students. Proposed to begin enrollments in fall 2021, it is anticipated that approximately 20 students will enroll in the BS NSS and grow to about 90 or more student enrollments by year five.

The proposed curriculum is aligned with national norms while still maintaining some uniqueness. No public university in Tennessee offers a BS NSS. APSU’s proposed program will leverage professional experiences of APSU faculty and military officials from Fort Campbell. This degree provides an avenue to expand and enhance the existing workforce in the state and region.

Potential applicants will be drawn from the following populations:
  • Current undergraduate students who anticipate working in international, national, state or local security fields.  Examples include ROTC cadets in anticipation of their military careers and veterans wishing to return to work for the DOD as a civilian or civilian contractor.
  • Current employees of national security agencies who wish to advance their careers. A degree is becoming commonplace for those desiring advancement in their current careers or as avenues for new career opportunities. DHS, DOJ, DOD, the State Department, and private companies contracting in national security related fields seek talented individuals with a degree.
  • Military personnel who desire career advancement both now and upon separating from the military. Austin Peay State University is unique in its proximity to and relationship with the Fort Campbell military post. Fort Campbell, Kentucky, has the third largest military population within the U.S. Army and ranks the seventh largest within the Department of Defense with approximately 29,000 active-duty military and 112,629 retirees. The proximity and relationship to Fort Campbell positions the B.S. in National Security Studies to provide a relevant program to military personnel and assist with promotions. The United States Army provides professional development in the form of tuition assistance and supports education through other financial incentives for those seeking promotion. Therefore, active-duty military and retirees are exceptional candidates for the proposed program, and an under-served pool of potential students already exists in close proximity to the campus.
The Hanover Research feasibility study (September 2019) reveals that APSU has the opportunity to become the first institution in the state to confer degrees in this discipline, a field designed to prepared students for careers in global threats, military actions, global policy, and law enforcement. National growth rate for degree conferrals in homeland security disciplines have increased by 12.7% in the past five years. This year, there are 18,564 jobs posted in the southeast that contain the words, "national security" as part of the job description. Over the next seven years, employment in national security occupations are expected to grow by 6.4% in the southeast resulting in 89,780 anticipated total jobs.  Tennessee’s national security occupations are expected to grow slightly higher by 6.7% over the next seven years resulting in 8,270 anticipated total jobs. National growth is expected to be 4% for national security occupations resulting in 385,700 anticipated total jobs.

The feasibility of the proposed BS NSS program is a strong indicator of demand. Based on student interest surveys, the proposed program appears to address an unmet need for undergraduate degrees. Hanover Research’s analysis reveals additional indicators of demand given the significantly greater labor market needs projected for the Clarksville region and the Southeastern United States. The proposed program supports APSU’s university mission to serve its community, including a significant military affiliated student population, the region, and the state of Tennessee.
 
C. Fall Census Enrollment
Background Information:  Austin Peay State University’s official census enrollment of 11,048 is the highest in the institution’s history, and the 1% growth increase from last fall to this fall makes APSU the only Locally Governed Institution (LGI) to show a four-year continuous growth. Furthermore, APSU has the highest three-year and four-year average enrollment growth of all Tennessee public universities and comes in second to the University of Tennessee Martin with the highest two-year enrollment growth.

Census is the date at which the "snapshot" of enrollment and student credit hours (SCH) is taken.

The census date is defined as the 14th day of all terms in the fall and spring and the seventh day for summer terms. This is a one-time snapshot based on who is enrolled on that date.


The official Census Enrollment Report for APSU includes the sum of all students enrolled on the 3 census dates in fall.
  • One each for Fall I (the first short fall term at Fort Campbell that begins in late August),
  • Full term (the long term and the part of Term A, a short term within fall that begins before the census date on Clarksville campus and other locations), and
  • Fall II (the second short fall term at Fort Campbell that begins in October).
 Therefore, official census enrollment numbers for APSU, unlike some other institutions, are not available until after the census date for Fall II.
 
Attachments:
Description:  The Census Enrollment Report contains the official headcount of students enrolled in credit-bearing courses, the full-time equivalent. APSU also disaggregates the headcount by the following classifications or groups:
  • level (undergraduate and graduate),
  • full-time and part-time enrollment status,
  • gender,
  • race and ethnicity,
  • age (traditional and adult learner),
  • classification (freshman, sophomore, etc.), and
  • type (first-time college student, transfer student, dual-enrolled student, etc.).
Although the University monitors enrollment on a daily basis, the Census Enrollment Report allows the institution to measure trends in enrollment based at the same exact point in the term (the 14th day of all terms, rather than the same date each year).

In addition, the Census Enrollment Report is the official number recognized by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) and assists in consistently calculating the student progression and completion data for the THEC Outcomes-Based Funding Formula.

The attached table produced by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission compares the rate of growth for all public universities in Tennessee.
Adjourn
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